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Monday, January 31, 2011

A beautiful country: Egypt in turmoil

While Egypt is facing its worst crisis in the last two-hundred years, I want to remember the wonderful time I had last year, while cruising the Nile River, relaxing on the gorgeous beach of Sharm El Sheikh or strolling through the streets of Heliopolis.

In addition to the Great Pyramids, Egypt's most famous landmark, the country offered innumerable treasures and places worth visiting.

The Temple of Hatshepsout, the most powerful queen to ever rule Egypt. She killed her brother and sat on the throne for twenty years. The Colossuses of Memnon in an oasis in the desert. It is said they were erected by a pharaos to honor the queen he loved.
An obelisk in the Temple of Karnak.
A statue of Ramses II in the Temple of Karnak. Notice the statue of his wife at his feet.
Sculptures of the god Seth and the goddess Isis in the temple of Kom Ombo, Seth's temple.

The magestic Nile River is the largest and longest river in the world. It originates in the Lake Victoria in Rwanda and the Lake Tana in Ethiopia.
Povery is staggering in the Egyptian villages along the Nile River. Villagers wash and bathe with their animals in the Nile River while they drink its water and the parasites causing the endemique Bilharsia disease.
Going in carriage through the city of Edfou.
The Temple of Edfou.
The beautiful Temple of Isis in the Island of Philea. I set part of my paranormal story in Philae.
Aswan, the largest city in Upper Egypt, where the Big Dam was built forty years ago across the Nile River.

The fabulous temple of Abou Simbel that European archeologists saved from drowning in the Nile River and moved to its present location in Abou Simbel.

The Sinai Desert that separates Egypt from Israel, and harbors the Convent of St. Catherine.

The beautiful beach of Sharm El Sheikh crowded with foreign tourists.
The Al-Ahram Street (Pyramids Street) with my grandfather's building on the right. My old aunt still lives on the second floor. The street is now patroled by army tanks as the presidential palace is five minutes away.


The little Greek Church where I was married many years ago hasn't changed at all.

If you like to travel and love to read, come and enjoy my international romances. I will take you around the world through stories that simmer with emotion and sizzle with heat.

BABIES IN THE BARGAIN winner of 2009 Best Romance Novel at Preditors & Editors and winner of 2009 Best Contemporary Romance at Readers Favorite.
Rx FOR TRUST, winner of 2010 Best Contemporary Romance at Readers Favorite and 2011 EPICON.
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22 comments:

Celia Yeary said...

Mona--wonderful photos. I fear for the safety of these treasures. Celia

Allison Chase said...

Beautiful pictures, Mona. It must have been a wonderful trip. I hope their troubles are over soon and I pray your family stays safe!

Barbara Monajem said...

Thank you, Mona.

Beth Trissel said...

What wonderful pictures Mona. I have a great great great grandmother buried in Alexandria. She and her husband had come to Egypt from Greece where they were missionaries because she was quite ill with consumption. It was thought the drier climate would help her, but either it didn't. or the journey was too exhausting in those days on top of an improper diet...who knows, but she died there leaving a four yr old son who was my great great grandfather.

Beth Trissel said...

I should add I am very concerned for the situation in Egypt and hope things settle down soon and that your people are OK.

Mona Risk said...

Thank you my friends. I wanted to show that Egypt is a beautiful country and the people a friendly peaceful lot in spite of what appears on TV. The big scare now are the looters and escaped prisoners roaming the streets.

Mona Risk said...

Beth, my ancestors also came from Greece, more precisely from the Island of Salonica. They three brothers were en route to America, but what of them got sea sick and ended his trip in Alexandria.

Beth Trissel said...

Very interesting, Mona, how your family ended up in Egypt. My great great great grandparents were from America and sailed to Greece for some kind of work in the church. She mentions seeing her Uncle James before they sailed --in one of her many letters--and she's referring to former President James Madison, still living at the time. I checked and he seems to have been a cousin, but maybe they called him uncle.

Tanya Hanson said...

Beautiful photos, Mona. I just heard on the news minutes ago the police/armd forces et al are doing their best to protect the treasures and museums, including Tut. Wow.

Maggie Toussaint said...

how lovely. I enjoyed the virtual tour and also your travel wardrobe!

Marian said...

Great pictures!

Mary Marvella said...

What a lovely way to honor the good people in the throes of chaos they didn't cause. Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Mona Risk said...

Tanya, I really hope they protect the museums. Although I keep heraing that "the situation is deteriorating" on TV.

Mona Risk said...

LOL Maggie, you notice the clothes!!!

Mona Risk said...

Thank you Marian.

Mary, we are worried to death about the cousins who are there. Safety is getting worse with time.

Mary Ricksen said...

This whole thing in Egypt breaks my heart. To think the crazy street low lifes are ruining national treasures is sickening. The thought of innocents being hurt in all of this is frightening. I pray for your family and all of the good people of Egypt. May God take care of them...

StephB said...

Mona,
What lovely pictures! You really gave me a wonderful visual for Egypt and it's treasures. I'm praying for the situation over there. I hope that they preserve their history and don't ruin their monuments.

Steph

Sandra Cox said...

Totally breathtaking.

Mona Risk said...

Unfortunately I just heard they put the fire to the Museum of Cairo. Can you believe the magnificent display of King Tut destroyed by Egyptian looters? I am about to cry.

Sandra Cox said...

How heartbreaking.

Clarissa Southwick said...

What beautiful pictures, Mona. Thanks for reminding us of quieter times and all the treasures Egypt has to offer.

Robert Alexandriysky said...

Hi Mona,

Thanks for sharing your story.

Do you know the district where Greek people lived in Alexandria at the end of XIX century.

I have a great grandfather who has come from Kyustendil Bulgaria to Alexandria and I am looking to find any evidence for his life there.